Learning Stations and Centres in the English Language Classroom

Using stations is a fantastic way to increase engagement in the English Language Arts classroom. Get ideas on how to use and manage stations in your middle or high school ELA classroom from 2 Peas and a Dog.

Using learning stations is a fantastic way to increase engagement in the English Language Arts classroom. Students enjoy working collaboratively with their peers. Read this #2ndaryELA Twitter chat recap below to get ideas on how to use and manage stations in your middle or high school English Language Arts classroom.

 

Question 1: How do you use learning stations or centers in connection with reading?

A1: I like to use stations to review literary elements and preview novels https://t.co/wHdS8ltSwJ

A1: I use stations to solidify content after I have taught the lessons.

A1: Learning stations to offer choice and voice to students. Ss all have different needs, stations help them lead their learning.

A1: Various ways (we are prepping for state test)-T-chart and thesis on a prompt, editing a draft, mechanics practice, etc.


Question 2: How do you use learning stations or centers in connection with writing?

A2: It would be cool to have an archive of all the stations we’ve used for writing to pull from – maybe on Google?

A2: I use stations for differentiation: support, practice, or extension depending on past performance. Get to work closely w/Ss
A2: I have used stations to have students edit their work. Each station has a different editing task.


Question 3: Are the activities in your learning stations or centers usually independent or collaborative?

A3: Reading stations usually collaborative when reviewing, a mix when previewing a new text. Writing stations usually independent

A3: A mix of both. Use stations to offer challenges; choice for ind or collab. Vary stations throughout semester to adapt to Ss

A3: A mix of both

A3: Stations in my room are always collaborative

A3: I try for a mix of independent & collaborative tasks. I use stations to ensure I meet with all students for small group time.

A3: The process is always collaborative but sometimes the product is individual.


Question 4: Is there always a tangible product in your learning stations or centers? How do you hold students accountable for their work?

A4: During review type stations, I just monitor the room, check stations at the end of each rotation. I don’t need more grading

A4: Not always about a tangible product. Sometimes it is about reflecting and developing skills. Sharing experiences. Autonomy.

A4: Many times there is a prod. Ss have a checklist that requires them to answer a Q that can only be A by the station wk.

A4 cont: For writing stations, their pre-writing or revising will impact final piece so that work is turned in, but not graded

A4: I don’t necessarily grade stations – it’s usually practice.

A4: The product is an issue for me as a newbie.Ss are mostly gaining practice, & I don’t want to collect it all.

A4: I try to ensure each station has some sort of a tangible item (assignment, task sheet or exit card) or new learning.

A4: I assess mostly for completion. I show models and Ss reflect on their performance using rubrics and samples.

Question 5: How do you manage student behavior during learning stations or centers?

A5: I make the students practice rotating, putting things away at stations, and always use a timer to keep things moving

A5: You try it, set out expectations and learn together. Adjust, reflect, conference. Don’t strive for perfection.

A5: Reminder of expectations and agreements w/ continual monitoring. 3 strikes, Ss sits out.

A5: Stations follow my classroom management routines. I also leave my small group to work for a few minutes and rotate.

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