Report Cards for the Teacher

It is important for students to feel that they have some ownership of their learning. One way to provide student voice in the classroom is by allowing them to provide regular and meaningful feedback on teacher lessons and the classroom environment. Read how one teacher uses "teacher report cards" in her classroom to create an inclusive classroom and to constantly evolve her teaching practice from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

Twice a year (February and June), students in my class are given the opportunity to give me descriptive feedback on how they feel the year is going in our classroom. I align these times with when I hand out their report cards. 

My philosophy is that if I am going to give them an update on how they are doing, they need to do the same for me and our classroom. 

I have done this teacher report card in different ways:
  • students working independently or in pairs to answer given questions
  • students working independently or in pairs to create a T chart of things that are going well for the classroom/things that they wish for the classroom
Other Considerations:
  • It is always anonymous - I do not want names etc 
  • I take their opinions into consideration for: future units of study, adjusting my teaching style, general classroom ideas
Next year I will have students fill out my report card in a Google Doc to increase their knowledge of this valuable technology tool. 

Here is the process I follow:
  1. We start by discussing that without feedback we cannot grow as students, writers, authors, mathematicians, etc. Then we discussed appropriate forms of feedback: requests for the classroom, things they like about the classroom.
  2. Then we discuss non-appropriate forms of feedback: comments about other students or teachers etc.
  3. Students are encouraged to write down a solution to the items they write on the "wish they could change list".
  4. Then I hand out paper and they get to work writing down things they like/want to improve.
My students wrote my "report card" last Thursday. Here are some of the things they said: 

Likes: variety of books in the classroom library, how the classroom seating plan changes regularly, how I don't rush through Math lessons

Wishes: show videos to illustrate Math/English concepts, they want to try different activities with their reading buddies not just reading related activities, new books for the classroom library, more time for silent reading (who knew!)

I was very impressed with their thoughtful responses, and I am going to try to  work on as many of their wishes as possible.

Other Methods:

  • Have students fill out a premade questionnaire on Google Forms
  • Hand out a 3,2,1 Chart to the students and have them write: 3 things they enjoyed about the class, 2 things they found difficult or could be changed about the class (must propose a solution), and 1 final thought, or 1 thing they liked/disliked about my teaching style, or 1 suggestion for next year
I think student-teacher feedback can be done at all grade levels as long as the activity is structured and modified to suit the grade level, and the readiness level of your students.


It is important for students to feel that they have some ownership of their learning. One way to provide student voice in the classroom is by allowing them to provide regular and meaningful feedback on teacher lessons and the classroom environment. Read how one teacher uses "teacher report cards" in her classroom to create an inclusive classroom and to constantly evolve her teaching practice from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

3 comments

  1. I liked your choices of Things they liked and they wished. A glow and a grow. :) Great idea!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love your idea of a GLOW and GROW! I have only seen 2 Stars and a Wish! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've used a Star and a Wish before when we do "fish bowls" for writing. I love the idea of using it as a concept anchor for this sort of activity as well!

    ReplyDelete

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