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End of the Year Classroom Management Strategies

The end of the year is a stressful time. Ten teacher bloggers have taken the time to share their thoughts on how to make classroom management more manageable during the year end chaos from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

The end of the year always sneaks up on me. One moment it’s Christmas time - then all of a sudden daylight savings, warmer days and May and June emerge out of nowhere. I always tell myself - “This year will be different! I won’t get caught up and not see the end is near.” Yet, here we go again. It’s almost May and I don’t know where the time went.

Before we can take that much needed time to reflect, we need to survive the chaos that is the last few weeks of the school year. This time of year is full of planned and surprise interruptions. Ten teacher bloggers have taken the time to share their thoughts on how to make the end of the year more manageable for teachers.

This four part series will discuss:

  • Week 1: End of the Year Classroom Management
  • Week 2: Favourite End of the Year Lessons, Assignments and Units
  • Week 3: Special End of the Year Activities For Students
  • Week 4: End of the Year Teacher Reflections 

What is your best classroom management advice for the end of the year? 

1. Routines, routines and more routines. Do not change things up now. Students like to know things ahead of time- so post your week at a glance for them to see. I noticed that once I started posted a week at a glance for my students - they started to come more prepared for class and ready to learn. Also don’t forget that at any point in the year it is OK to get in touch with a student’s parents. The last few weeks are not exempt.  Kristy from 2 Peas and a Dog

2. Give the students time to reflect on what they've accomplished and learned this year. Have a couple of projects ready to go for this purpose and spread them out over the last few weeks so when they get too squirrelly you can get them back on track with a "fun" project that lets them show off their skills. Meghan from Fun Fresh Ideas 

3. Keep the expectations high and the interest level higher! Pull out the most engaging projects and tap into the most controversial or exciting topics to keep them wanting to do and learn more! Michele from A Lesson Plan For Teachers

4. Try something new to keep them guessing so they won't tune you out! I like to introduce new ways to up the ante with my reward system like adding in a BINGO board. Lisa from Mrs Spangler in the Middle

5. It is important to keep students focused, but to build in some opportunities for fun. This is a great time to use review games, student choice, and hands-on projects to help with engagement. Tara from Science in the City

6. In order to keep students focused at the end of the school year, it's important to keep them engaged and busy.  Even though we're all tired, I don't like to have a lot "down" time in my classroom.  I also try to maintain regular routines through the last days. Kim from OC Beach Teacher

7. The end of the year can really seem to drag on, and students are a mix of hyper-tired-stressed-hyper. The best tip I have is to create space for them to both expend energy AND calm down (in case they're dreading exams, etc.). In my classroom, we start each day of the last couple weeks with a drama game to help get rid of the hyper. Then, we move into review (games, collaborative quizzes, Kahoot, etc.). The last ten minutes, however, we do free writing activities or colour as we listen to an audiobook or podcast. Planning around their energy level really helps keep students focused at the end of the year. Danielle from Teach Nouvelle

8. Try new, daring and edgy things! You might think it's the WORST TIME, but it's really the best. Do a breakout.edu. Try virtual environment gamified instruction (minecraft.edu), keep them engaged. Mary from Your Smarticles

9. The end of the year is an amazing time to loosen up and really bond with students before they leave your room (possibly forever!). I find that if I'm consistent with my expectations throughout the year, my students and I share a mutual respect, and I really don't have to do anything differently (other than maybe remind them that it's still not okay to go to the bathroom twice in one period.) At the end of the year, I love to have discussions, collaborative activities and even take students outside to enjoy the beautiful weather. These approaches seem to keep behaviour issues at bay. Melissa from The Reading and Writing Haven

10. Make things fun! Randi from 4 The Love of Math

Want more great end of the year tips and tricks? Check out our other blog posts.

The end of the year is a stressful time. Ten teacher bloggers have taken the time to share their thoughts on how to make classroom management more manageable during the year end chaos from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.
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#2ndaryELA Twitter Chat on Tuesday 4/25 Topic: Article of the Week

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about implementing article of the week.
Brynn Allison, The Literary Maven & Kristy, 2 Peas and a Dog host #2ndaryELA on Twitter every Tuesday evening from 8 - 8:30 PM EST. #2ndaryELA is a weekly chat for secondary English Language Arts teachers focused on a topic. Every Sunday, we post the topic and questions on our blogs to allow you to prepare for the upcoming Tuesday evening's chat. Thank you to everyone who joined us last week and we hope that you will join us again.

We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group, even if you aren't on Twitter. 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction.

On Tuesday, April 25, our #2ndaryELA chat will be about implementing article of the week.

The Format:
8:00 Intros: What and where do you teach? Include a link to your blog if you have one. #2ndaryELA
8:05 Q1: Have you tried using AOTW in your classrooms? Why or why not? Your experiences? #2ndaryELA
8:10 Q2: Share your best tips for managing this heavy marking load. #2ndaryELA
8:15 Q3: Where do you find the articles you use each week? #2ndaryELA
8:20 Q4: How do you differentiate the articles for different reading levels and interests in your classroom? #2ndaryELA
8:25 Q5: Share any resources you have found helpful for implementing ATOW (blog posts, books, websites, etc.). #2ndaryELA

The Directions:
1. Log into Twitter on Tuesday from 8-8:30 PM EST.
2. Search for tweets with the hashtag #2ndaryELA in the search bar. Make sure to click “All tweets.”
3. Introductions are for the first 5 minutes.
4. Starting at 8:05 (@literarymaven or @2peasandadog) will post questions every 5 minutes using the format Q1, Q2, Q3, etc. and the hashtag #2ndaryELA.
5. Respond to questions using the format A1, A2, A3, etc. with #2ndaryELA.
6. Follow any teachers responding and who are also using #2ndaryELA.
7. Like and respond to other teachers' tweets.

You can schedule your responses to the questions ahead of time using a scheduler like TweetDeck or HootSuite (but don't forget to use A1, A2, etc. and #2ndaryELA). Links are encouraged, so be sure to use a link shortener like tinyurlbitlygoo.gl or ow.ly Just visit one of those links and paste your long link to shorten it for Twitter. Using images is also encouraged when relevant.

New to chats? Here are the rules:
1. Stay on topic & stay positive!
2. Please do not post or promote paid products unless specifically asked.
3. If you arrive late, try to look through other posts before beginning.
4. Feel free to just read, like, and/or retweet.
5. Always use our hashtag #2ndaryELA, including in your replies to others.
6. Make sure your twitter feed is set to public. (Also keep in mind that Twitter is completely public – that means students, parents, and administrators can and will read what you tweet.)

Be sure to spread the word to any teacher friends who might be interested in joining us as well. We look forward to chatting with you Tuesday evening and in our 2ndaryELA Facebook group!

Get caught up on past chats here:





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How to Use the Search Feature In Facebook Groups

Stop scrolling endlessly through Facebook Groups. Use the search feature to locate information quickly from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

I love Facebook Groups, they are a huge source of information. However, we all need to stop scrolling endlessly through Facebook Groups and use the provided search feature to locate information quickly. Click on the image below to watch the quick tutorial on how to make Facebook Groups work for you.





Teach Grades 6 to 12 English Language Arts? Join our #2ndaryELA Facebook Teacher Facebook Group.



#2ndaryELA Twitter Chat on Tuesday 4/18 Topic: Measuring Student Learning

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about measuring student learning.
Brynn Allison, The Literary Maven & Kristy, 2 Peas and a Dog host #2ndaryELA on Twitter every Tuesday evening from 8 - 8:30 PM EST. #2ndaryELA is a weekly chat for secondary English Language Arts teachers focused on a topic. Every Sunday, we post the topic and questions on our blogs to allow you to prepare for the upcoming Tuesday evening's chat. Thank you to everyone who joined us last week and we hope that you will join us again.

We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group, even if you aren't on Twitter. 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction.

On Tuesday, April 18, our #2ndaryELA chat will be about measuring student learning.

The Format:
8:00 Intros: What and where do you teach? Include a link to your blog if you have one. #2ndaryELA
8:05 Q1: What types of informal assessments do you use to measure learning in your classroom? #2ndaryELA
8:10 Q2: What is your favorite or most creative way of assessing students? #2ndaryELA
8:15 Q3: Are you required to use certain formal assessments or do you design your own? #2ndaryELA
8:20 Q4: Are your assessments based on standards? Skills? Content? How does that affect the design? #2ndaryELA
8:25 Q5: How do you use data from assessments to plan future lessons? #2ndaryELA

The Directions:
1. Log into Twitter on Tuesday from 8-8:30 PM EST.
2. Search for tweets with the hashtag #2ndaryELA in the search bar. Make sure to click “All tweets.”
3. Introductions are for the first 5 minutes.
4. Starting at 8:05 (@literarymaven or @2peasandadog) will post questions every 5 minutes using the format Q1, Q2, Q3, etc. and the hashtag #2ndaryELA.
5. Respond to questions using the format A1, A2, A3, etc. with #2ndaryELA.
6. Follow any teachers responding and who are also using #2ndaryELA.
7. Like and respond to other teachers' tweets.

You can schedule your responses to the questions ahead of time using a scheduler like TweetDeck or HootSuite (but don't forget to use A1, A2, etc. and #2ndaryELA). Links are encouraged, so be sure to use a link shortener like tinyurlbitlygoo.gl or ow.ly Just visit one of those links and paste your long link to shorten it for Twitter. Using images is also encouraged when relevant.

New to chats? Here are the rules:
1. Stay on topic & stay positive!
2. Please do not post or promote paid products unless specifically asked.
3. If you arrive late, try to look through other posts before beginning.
4. Feel free to just read, like, and/or retweet.
5. Always use our hashtag #2ndaryELA, including in your replies to others.
6. Make sure your twitter feed is set to public. (Also keep in mind that Twitter is completely public – that means students, parents, and administrators can and will read what you tweet.)

Be sure to spread the word to any teacher friends who might be interested in joining us as well. We look forward to chatting with you Tuesday evening and in our 2ndaryELA Facebook group!

Get caught up on past chats here:





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Teaching Speaking and Listening Skills

Teaching students valuable and relevant speaking and listening skills is crucial for their future success. Once students leave our classrooms they will need to be able to carefully articulate their thoughts and opinions to various audiences. Read this blog post on how English teachers can help foster these skills in their classrooms from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

Teaching students valuable and relevant speaking and listening skills are crucial for their future success. Once students leave our classrooms they will need to be able to carefully articulate their thoughts and opinions to various audiences. 

Read the curated Twitter chat below on how English teachers can help foster these skills in their classrooms.



Teaching students valuable and relevant speaking and listening skills is crucial for their future success. Once students leave our classrooms they will need to be able to carefully articulate their thoughts and opinions to various audiences. Read this blog post on how English teachers can help foster these skills in their classrooms from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

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