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How To Save Facebook Posts

Use the save feature on Facebook posts to remember valuable content from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

Facebook posts can provide a lot of valuable content. It can be difficult to read it all at once, or remember to go back and look at your screenshots. Try using the save feature the next time you find great content on Facebook.

Click the image below to watch a quick video tutorial on how to save Facebook posts for future use.


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Use the save feature on Facebook posts to remember valuable content from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

How To Prepare For An Unexpected Sick Day

Top 3 tips for preparing for an unexpected sick day from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

It can happen to any teacher ----- you go to bed feeling normal and you wake up feeling terrible. In those short hours of sleep, your body stopped fighting all those germs you brought home and raises the "it's time to rest" flag. I try really hard to listen to my body to prevent these unexpected sick days, but it has happened two or three times in my ten-year career that I had to call in sick with nothing formally prepared.

 Top Sick Day Tips


1. Never leave your classroom at the end of the day until all materials needed for tomorrow's lessons are laid out. I use this upright organizer to keep all of my daily lessons ready to go.


2. Maintain an emergency "sub tub" full of ready to go activities that could be used any time of the year. These lessons would be used if you did not have the ability to write proper substitute teacher lessons. I have only used these lessons once or twice in my career, but it provided me with a peace of mind knowing that my students were still working on purposeful work, while I was at home recovering from an unexpected illness.


3. Be prepared. Just before I start a new unit, I stay late or arrive very early to work. I get all of the photocopying done ahead of time. By being prepared, I do not have to worry if I wake up feeling under the weather. All my prep work is done and I can focus my energy on teaching.


Simple things you can do as a teacher to ensure your supply teacher has a great day from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.  Type a Board Name  Simple things you can do as a teacher to ensure your supply teacher has a great day from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.
Check out this blog post from a supply teacher who shares how you can make her day a little easier in your classroom when you are away.

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Top 3 tips for preparing for an unexpected sick day from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

The Importance of End of the Year Teacher Reflections

The end of the year is a great time to reflect on the past year's successes and challenges. Use these reflections to help plan out changes for your future classes. Includes a FREE graphic organizer to help teachers reflect on their school year from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

This week marks our final instalment in our End of the Year blog post series.

This four-part series discussed:



Some of the most important things we can do as educators are to help students learn to reflect on their new learnings and experiences. I try to work reflection into various assignments throughout the year, as well as a major push during the last month of school. 


Use this FREE graphic organizer to help you reflect on your successes and challenges this year in your classroom from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

As teachers, we also need to take the time to really reflect on our year and think about what we need to Stop, Start and Continue for the following year. When we evaluate our current teaching practices and ideas - we make room for professional growth and seek out development opportunities. Teacher reflection should be done before summer break begins because after a summer of rest and relaxation all of those challenges we had during the school year seem to get forgotten. 

I created this one-page reflection graphic organizer to help teachers dig into reflecting about their teaching practices.

When I sat down to write this blog post I used the Stop, Start, Continue graphic organizer to help me organize my reflective thoughts.

Stop: Wasting my commuting time. I want to make it a priority to download podcasts for my long commute. I am in the car over an hour a day - that is a lot of time to listen to podcasts and/or audiobooks.

Start: Scheduling time to exercise. I come home from a day of teaching exhausted - all I want to do is put on my pyjamas and watch TV. This is not good for my physical health! I also need to ask other teachers how they organize make-up work for absent students. Can I get a personal assistant to help me manage all of the forms we have to collect as teachers? (Any suggestions please leave them in the comments below)

Continue: I cannot tell you how my students evolved in their reading skills this year with the implementation of daily silent reading. I kept students accountable through conferences and reading journals. They also became better writers and critical thinkers as they worked through their weekly article of the week assignment. I have linked the photos below to these assignments so you can see what my students worked on this year.


     

Recently I was discussing this upcoming blog post series with fellow teacher bloggers and they sent me these reflections about the importance of reflection in the teaching profession.

“I recently took several years off from teaching to raise a young family. I returned to teaching this school year. In that time off, I reflected on my years of teaching, of my students, of my successes and failures. One commonality that wove between my happy memories were of those final days of the school year. It makes sense: students are relaxed, you've built a community, and summer is almost tangible. As an adult, you can see how these young people have grown over a year, and you can imagine how they will continue to mature. Those final days are happy memories where you can witness the growth of your students and become excited about their futures. As the end of the school year approaches, take some time to appreciate what you have done as a teacher. You have created relationships with young people, you have watched them grow, and you have taught them important skills. You deserve the happiness that accompanies these realisations.” Lauralee from http://languageartsclassroom.com/

"At the end of the year, I think about my systems and how they can be tweaked for improved performance. One system that I am thinking about changing for next year is having students complete a study log before each test. This will allow me to verify that students have actually studied and I can keep it for parent conferences. I may even give bonus points for completing it with a parent signature. I'm also considering creating a small unit at the very beginning of the year to go over basic computer skills in my class. It's the end of the year and I'm still reminding students how to log out properly. I can avoid this frustration if I tackle it head on next year. I'm always looking for ways to improve and at the end of the year, I enjoy being able to find ways to make the next year even better."  Lisa from Mrs.Spangler in the Middle

"Effective teachers, by nature, are reflective. Most evaluation systems (such as the increasingly popular Charlotte Danielson framework) are moving toward an approach that demands frequent reflection and for good reason. I've taught for eleven years, and the one practice that has helped me grow, improve, and become more confident in my abilities is a daily reflection. The end of the year, especially, is the perfect time to look back on choices I've made (regarding curriculum, technology, classroom management, parent communication, etcetera) because I can see how all of those decisions played out. It's a humbling process...this notion of being honest with ourselves and admitting imperfections. But, it's in the admission of weakness that we can transform our teaching. Reflection gives me the inspiration to create new units and activities, to try or devise new instructional approaches, to better appreciate my students, to find a more appropriate balance between my work life and home life, and to conduct research in areas where I know I want to improve. To me, reflection is more valuable than any professional development session I've attended. Life is busy. Teachers are busier. This summer, take time to be still, think about your year, and set goals that will send you soaring into the next academic calendar." Melissa from http://www.readingandwritinghaven.com/

The end of the year is a great time to reflect on the past year's successes and challenges. Use these reflections to help plan out changes for your future classes. Includes a FREE graphic organizer to help teachers reflect on their school year from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.


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Special Activities for the End of the Year

Special out of the box ideas for end of the year activities that will help students stay focused until the end - from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

The end of the year is once again upon us! How does this happen? Every year it arrives very fast after Spring Break.


Many teacher bloggers have taken the time to share their thoughts on how to make the end of the year more manageable for teachers and special for students. This week we are discussing special end of the year activities that we LOVE teaching at this time of year.


This four part series will discuss:


Do you have any special activities planned for your students?


I teach Grade 8 so the last month is very busy with a year end trip, a graduation celebration and a Grade 7 vs 8 whole day soccer tournament. For my homeroom class, I would like to create a Word Cloud (Wordle or Tagxedo) for each student made up from adjectives their classmates would use to describe them.  Kristy from http://www.2peasandadog.com


I give my students a little gift each year - a magnet with an inspirational quote on it. I have a selection of quotes and I choose each one specifically for each student. They love knowing that I actually picked a special quote for them and most of them come to see me privately at some point during the last few days to find out why I chose the quote I chose for them. Meghan from http://www.funfreshideas.com

Try "Finish Strong" bingo in your classroom to encourage good behaviour at the end of the year.

I plan a "Finish Strong" BINGO where students who are on target will be able to earn tickets to place on my over-sized BINGO board in any open spot. On the last day of school, I have a big drawing with prizes that are inside brown paper lunch bags.  When a student's spot is called, they can pick any bag.  It's fun to see what each person gets and I try to include many summer items as a nice "send off". Lisa from http://mrsspanglerinthemiddle.com
Read more about Finish Strong Bingo on her blog.

My AP students will have a pizza party and then will get to create videos for future students about being in an AP class. Tara from www.scienceinthecityclassroom.com

When the weather is warm, I like to take my students outside into our school courtyard for Silent Sustained Reading. Kim from http://ocbeachteacher.blogspot.com/

At the end of the year, I always incorporate projects, speeches, discussions, station activities, and games...anything to get students involved, moving, and in charge of their own learning. Melissa from http://www.readingandwritinghaven.com/

I like having students spend time outside measuring slope with sidewalk chalk graphs Randi from http://www.4theloveofmath.com

Tips for surviving the end of the year from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.

Want more great end of the year ideas? Read them now. 

Special out of the box ideas for end of the year activities that will help students stay focused until the end - from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog.
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#2ndaryELA Twitter Chat on Tuesday 5/9 Topic: Reflecting and Recharging

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about reflecting on this school year and recharging for the next one.
Brynn Allison, The Literary Maven & Kristy, 2 Peas and a Dog host #2ndaryELA on Twitter every Tuesday evening from 8 - 8:30 PM EST. #2ndaryELA is a weekly chat for secondary English Language Arts teachers focused on a topic. Every Sunday, we post the topic and questions on our blogs to allow you to prepare for the upcoming Tuesday evening's chat. Thank you to everyone who joined us last week and we hope that you will join us again.

We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group, even if you aren't on Twitter. 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction.

On Tuesday, May 9, our #2ndaryELA chat will be about reflecting on this school year and recharging for the next one.

The Format:
8:00 Intros: What and where do you teach? Include a link to your blog if you have one. #2ndaryELA
8:05 Q1: What were your greatest successes this school year?
8:10 Q2: What do you hope to improve upon for next year? #2ndaryELA
8:15 Q3: What are your personal and professional plans for summer 2017? #2ndaryELA
8:20 Q4: What is on your personal and professional summer reading lists? #2ndaryELA
8:25 Q5: Share your best advice for having a relaxing summer. #2ndaryELA

The Directions:
1. Log into Twitter on Tuesday from 8-8:30 PM EST.
2. Search for tweets with the hashtag #2ndaryELA in the search bar. Make sure to click “All tweets.”
3. Introductions are for the first 5 minutes.
4. Starting at 8:05 (@literarymaven or @2peasandadog) will post questions every 5 minutes using the format Q1, Q2, Q3, etc. and the hashtag #2ndaryELA.
5. Respond to questions using the format A1, A2, A3, etc. with #2ndaryELA.
6. Follow any teachers responding and who are also using #2ndaryELA.
7. Like and respond to other teachers' tweets.

You can schedule your responses to the questions ahead of time using a scheduler like TweetDeck or HootSuite (but don't forget to use A1, A2, etc. and #2ndaryELA). Links are encouraged, so be sure to use a link shortener like tinyurlbitlygoo.gl or ow.ly Just visit one of those links and paste your long link to shorten it for Twitter. Using images is also encouraged when relevant.

New to chats? Here are the rules:
1. Stay on topic & stay positive!
2. Please do not post or promote paid products unless specifically asked.
3. If you arrive late, try to look through other posts before beginning.
4. Feel free to just read, like, and/or retweet.
5. Always use our hashtag #2ndaryELA, including in your replies to others.
6. Make sure your twitter feed is set to public. (Also keep in mind that Twitter is completely public – that means students, parents, and administrators can and will read what you tweet.)

Be sure to spread the word to any teacher friends who might be interested in joining us as well. We look forward to chatting with you Tuesday evening and in our 2ndaryELA Facebook group!

Get caught up on past chats here:





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